Exhibitors

" Phantom is a 23 year old tobiano paint mare. She is the long time partner to Tara Jones of Pieceful Solutions Riding and Training. Throughout their 17 year partnership, Phantom has been featured in a DVD series, a book series, and has performed demos at numerous expos."

"Tara Jones is an educator, author, and trainer from Telford, Pa. She owns and runs her business Pieceful Solutions Riding and Training where she specializes in rehabilitation, and technical enhancements using the science of movement. By bringing together all the pieces of the riding and training puzzle, she creates confident horses, and knowledgeable riders. She teaches her system through private instruction or clinic format, and will be scheduling a date for 2020 here at Tuckahoe. Visit her website at tarajonestraining.com"

The Paso Fino name means 'fine step'. The Paso Fino is a blend of the Barb, Spanish Jennet, and Andalusian horseand was bredby Spanish land owners in Puerto Rico and Colombia to be used in the plantations because of their endurance and comfortable ride.

Their offspring are naturally gaited with a smooth 4 beat gait. They are used today in all disciplines. They can show, work cattle, barrel race, hunt and endurance ride. They are intelligent and willing horses. Their main gaits are ‘Fino’ which is a high step with very little forward movement, a ‘corto’ which is their “trot” but can be ridden seated as it’s very smooth. Their ‘largo’ is a faster gait where they stretch their stride a bit more. After riding a Paso for the first time I decided I had to have one of these sure footed, smooth little horses and bought my first horse the following month. We are going into our third year together. I’ve loved every minute with her!

Side Saddle

About the rider: Heidi Feustel Ferguson:
* uncle trained Man o’ War (Louis Feustel)
* former Chief Horse Management Judge for United States Pony Club
* former 4H advisor
* currently active with The American Driving Society as their Mid Atlantic Regional Director,
Recreational Driving Chair, MARD Organizer (a four day carriage driving event held in Fair Hill, MD…aka Mid Atlantic Recreational Drive)
* former breeder with American Sport Pony Registry
* hunted side saddle with several hunts in the New England area
* former national side saddle competitor (standing third in country before horse died mid season)
* past and present member of New England Aside, International Side Saddle Association, Mid-Atlantic Ladies Aside
          About the horse: Lasting Impression  26-year-old, 17hh Oldenburg by Art Deco o/o Countess Brooke by Count Fleet
          About the Side Saddle and Habit:
Owen side saddle, one of the premiere, and highly-sough-after “Old Name English” side saddles made in England. Modern side saddles feature an upper crutch and a leaping head, not visible when the rider is properly mounted. Habit is a modern Sporty Habit made in England by Bit on the Side Saddle. Not suitable for showing. This is a training & recreational habit only.
          A little history:
Modern side saddle habits feature a safety apron design, which reduces the potential for a rider’s skirt getting caught on the upper crutch of the saddle, a design virtually eliminating the possibility of a lady getting dragged by her apparel. Traditional modern habits follow a strict design, fit and pattern. Vintage habits are highly sought after; I own and have both shown and fox-hunted in several.
The style of side saddle riding is very traditional and, to be done correctly for show standards, rules and appearance must strictly be followed. Today, most side saddle riders have adopted the modern safety helmet for active riding, saving the more elegant top hats and bowlers for photo ops before the hunt moves off or the show begins. Side saddles are made for several disciplines: hunt seat, saddle seat, western, park, Spanish to name just a few.
Though many fear side saddle/aside riding as being precarious, in reality, it is more secure than astride riding due to the ability to employ several means of securing one’s seat via the use of techniques known as the purchase grip and the reserve grip. Keeping one’s right shoulder back is imperative, as it prevents the rider from rotating around the leaping head and upper crutch and, as a result, falling either right or left from the horse.

Standardbreds

Standardbreds got their name due to the "standard" time required to pace or trot a mile.  Standardbreds in Maryland race between 2 tracks, Rosecroft Raceway in Prince George’s County, just outside DC and Ocean Downs which traditionally races during the peak of vacation season.  Currently harness racing takes place every Sunday and Wednesday at Rosecroft.  Standardbreds also are very versatile and after they are retired from racing can be used for a wide range of equine activities.

More Information can be found at www.cloverleafsoa.org

Positive Strides Therapeutic Riding Center, Inc.

Positive Strides strives to build confidence, self-esteem and a sense of accomplishment for individuals with physical, cognitive and emotional needs by utilizing equine-assisted activities and therapies. We have been providing these services to residents of the Eastern Shore since 1981

From autism and addiction recovery to PTSD and cerebral palsy, equine therapy can play a powerful role in giving a person the confidence and skills they need to live a fulfilling life. Our CATCH Riders program helps youth at risk and adults recovering from family violence and sexual abuse. Just brushing and interacting with a horse can calm a person with dementia or help someone with depression.

We are certified by PATH, Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, and our instructors and therapists are also certified by PATH.

Located in at Timber Grove Farm, 6292 Statum Rd Preston, MD 21655

Visit our website at www.positivestridescenter.org  and like us on Facebook

FMI contact Kim Hopkins, Executive Director positivestridesed@gmail.com  443-239-4953

DELMARVA Mounted Search and Rescue is a professional, volunteer organization comprised of military, fire/rescue, medical/EMS, police/corrections, and civilian trained responders all working towards one goal ... to preserve life when the odds are stacked against the victim. Ground Search and Rescue: Our team trains to, and requires certifica-tion in, the NASAR SARTECH standards. Additionally, we have mem-bers who have completed the Managing Lost Person Incidents (MLPI) training, attended the National Search & Rescue School for I-SAR (Inland SAR), and other Search Management courses. Each member has completed hundreds of hours of SAR-related training and field work. Canine Search and Rescue: We currently have operational ca-nines and others training for SAR work. We train and utilize airscenting and HRD canines. The team regularly trains with other canine SAR teams in the region. The team has mutual aid agreements with other agencies, so we can deploy operational HRD, airscenting, and tracking dogs as requested.

Frida Icelandic Drill Team - Meet this most beloved ambassador from the Island of Fire and Ice: The Icelandic Horse! Though shorter in stat-ure than many other riding horses, there is nothing small about this horse’s capacity for service. Till after the end of WWII, Icelanders relied on their horses for their very survival: to plow their fields, pull their carts, and get them from place to place across volcanic fields, mountains and the ever-present rivers and streams. Once modern roads, cars, tractors and trucks arrived, Icelanders continued their close relationship with this fabled “most valuable servant,” and over 80,000 horses play a signifi-cant role in the lives of Icelanders today. The emphasis today in breed-ing for 21st Century requirements focuses on preserving that coopera-tive character and smoothness of gait while taking advantage of better nutritional understanding to create robust, slightly larger horses who live useful lives well into their 30’s or beyond. The United States Icelandic Horse Congress describes the modern Icelandic Horse as primarily, “a riding horse... unique in its gaits... virtually all Icelandic horses have tölt in addition to walk, trot, and canter/gallop. Many horses have the addi-tional gait of very fast (flying) pace. As a riding horse it is extraordinarily versatile - a capable, willing horse for pleasure riding, and for sport competitions, suitable for adults and children. The horse is tough, inde-pendent, yet sociable and easy to get on with, is self-assured and has good staying power.”

JOUSTING - “Charge, Sir Knight, Charge” Have you ever heard that and wondered what it meant? These words conjure up romantic visions
of Knights in Shining Armor on charging horses, King Arthur’s Court, Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere. But in our world, this is the official call
to the “Knights” or riders in a jousting tournament. Jousting is the oldest equestrian sport in the world and became Maryland’s Official State
Sport in 1962. Jousting today has become a civilized game of keen horsemanship, skill and sportsmanship with the development of “The
Ring Tournaments”. The Jousting demonstration is being put on by members of the Eastern Shore Jousting Association. The Association
is made up of members, male and female of all ages, from the Mid-Shore area. Local jousts are held throughout the Caroline, Talbot,
Queen Anne, Wicomico and Kent County areas. The object of Jousting is to run your horse at a gait greater than a walk down the 80 yard jousting path three times and spear up to 3 rings each time for a total of 9 rings in under 8 seconds (except Novice and Leadline which are not
timed). Ring sizes range from 1 ¾” to 1” in diameter. In the event of ties, rings will drop ¼” in size until a winner is announced. The smallest
ring to be caught is a ¼” which is equivalent to a life saver. There are 5 classes involved: Leadline – 1 ¾”, Novice – 1 ¾”, Amateur – 1 ¼”, Semi
-Pro – 1 ½”, and Pro – 1”. Visit the tent near the track for more information.

Meet this most beloved ambassador from the Island of Fire and Ice: The Icelandic Horse! Though shorter in stature than many other riding horses, there is nothing small about this horse’s capacity for service.  Till after the end of WWII, Icelanders relied on their horses for their very survival: to plow their fields, pull their carts, and get them from place to place across volcanic fields, mountains and the ever-present

rivers and streams. Once modern roads, cars, tractors and trucks arrived, Icelanders continued their close relationship with this fabled “most valuable servant,” and over 80,000 horses play a significant role in the lives of Icelanders today.

The emphasis today in breeding for 21st Century requirements focuses on preserving that cooperative character and smoothness of gait while taking advantage of better nutritional understanding to create robust, slightly larger horses who live useful lives well into their 30’s or beyond.

The United States Icelandic Horse Congress describes the modern Icelandic Horse as primarily, “ a riding horse... unique in its gaits... virtually all Icelandic horses have tölt in addition to walk, trot, and canter/gallop. Many horses have the additional gait of very fast (flying) pace. As a riding horse it is extraordinarily versatile - a capable, willing horse for pleasure riding, and for sport competitions, suitable for adults and children. The horse is tough, independent, yet sociable and easy to get on with, is self-assured and has good staying power.”

Tuckahoe Equestrian Center Proudly created with Wix.com

GPS Address

619 Crouse Mill Rd.

Queen Anne, MD 21657

 

Mailing Address

PO Box 251

Denton, MD 21629

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We are a Non Profit 501 (c) (3) Organization

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